‘Superauthors’ and the social media catwalk

Nowadays, authors must have the superpowers to make themselves heard in a world where over two million books are published each year. Superauthors write beautiful books and know how to strut their stuff on the social media catwalk, but the modern author doesn’t have to go it alone.

Superauthors lock themselves away to write, but they connect with likeminded people, via social media, and tweet about their writing journey.  They tweet and post on Facebook about: funny events, sad events, offer quotations from writers who inspire them and images of world surrounding them. After long periods of tapping at the keyboard, my role models also find time to read and review books. Coffee and cake consumed, this unique author goes an extra mile to share to support others when they are having a little wobble. They will also retweet other authors’ cover reveals, publication days etc. It is a wonderful supportive community of authors, and I have the greatest of respect for these dedicated, talented people.

Social media means the writer is no longer alone on their writing journey, and they have a green room where they can vent frustrations about editing, writing and editing. However, once the book is finished, it is time to plan the walk on the social media catwalk to promote the book. Firstly, the author must dress up the book in as many advertisement guises as possible then send it out on the social media catwalk.  Walking the social media catwalk also involves: stopping for an interview, turning to provide an extract. stumbling on mean review, bowing gracefully when they receive a positive accolade and re-tweeting like mad.  The parade down the media catwalk looks like fun, but don’t be fooled, each step has been carefully planned. Superauthors engage support from their community before they face the spotlight, and take the time to visit Facebook pages, interact and comment in the way a friend may drop in occasionally.  They re-tweet and share references about their work of others.

As a tribute to these hardworking role models, I have developed virtual rooms for authors to promote their work throughout the year. I have observed that the promotion activity cannot be limited to one short period of time, and authors can’t go it alone. My Handbag Gallery, Chat Room, Bag a Bargain, Extract, News and reviews and are gifts to these wonderful team players.  It enables me to shout about their works of art in a gallery, plus it provides them with tweets and posts to celebrate. And I get to collect more role models and friends, while also interacting with inspirational people.

Cheers to my role models and friends – you know who you are! Thanks for popping up on Twitter and Facebook and my blogs.  Many thanks for writing about me in your blogs.  Your handbags are so last season and may need updating as you write more books. Thanks for the happy handbags and beautiful books!

Any new friends are welcome to visit my website and drop in on the authors in the Handbag Gallery and Chat Room. There is an abundance of learned role models, with great books, fabulous handbags and a wealth of advice. I am looking forward to launching more pages for authors and readers.

Feel free to send me a photo of your book in your handbag and you can join my community of superauthors.

 

Please see all my adventures at Handbag Adventures and my blog at jessiecahalin.com.

 

What the Dickens?

Holiday adventures…

Broadstairs was the fifth seaside town we had visited on a glorious, Arctic summer’s day. Nostalgia fatigue was attacking my senses beside the seaside, and I didn’t have any ‘Great Expectations’.

A sickly scent of palm oil signalled the end of lunchtime.  Ignoring the proud white villas, I noticed the litter on the beach.  I snubbed another ‘Old Curiosity Shop’ presenting the British souvenirs from China.  Branded eateries and coffee houses were shoehorned into the old buildings, and the walls seemed to be bulging with despair.

I couldn’t find any inspiration.  The stark, white house in front of me was as blank as my mind.  A tourist, wearing shorts and flipflops, pushed past me.  An optimistic tourist was buying a sunhat. My husband was pointing to another plaque above a door. I considered retrieving my thermal gear from the car.

The plaque was attached to the indistinct Royal Albion Hotel.  The sooty coloured plaque indicated that Dickens had lived there and written part of ‘Nicholas Nickleby’ during his time there.  Now, I marvelled at the view that would have inspired him.  The Royal Albion Hotel had sheltered ‘Our Mutual Friend’. Turning to my phone, I googled information about Dickens in Broadstairs. My twenty first century phone found a gateway into the mind of the nineteenth century Dickens who spoke to me of:

‘prowling about the rooms, sitting down, getting up, stirring the fire, looking out of the window, teasing my hair, sitting to write, writing nothing, writing something and tearing it up.’

Dickens teased those ‘Hard Times’ faced by authors into the long sentence, each thought slamming into another comma, then another comma and another.  What the Dickens?  If the master suffered writer’s block then it must be fine.

On returning home, I ‘lit the fire’,’ teased my hair’ and began to write. The ink bottle remained unopened as I tapped on the keyboard. I pressed delete, delete, delete and rejoiced that there will be some ‘Hard Times’ before the story flows.  Indeed, Dickens knew that:

Hungry for more inspiration from Dickens. I searched for the places he had stayed in I found out that Dickens had also stayed in Folkestone.  Dickens stayed at Albion Villas, Folkestone and wrote part of ‘Little Dorrit’ in the house. He also used to frequent The British Lion.

What the Dickens? We used to live on The Leas, in Folkestone, and I had never known about the connection.  My travels revealed that:

‘Happiness is a gift and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight when it comes.’

 

Please see all my travels at Handbag Adventures and my blog at jessiecahalin.com.