Meeting Jane Austen

Today, I attended the Bennet household. Alas, Elizabeth was not at home. I was rather shocked to be greeted by her father, Mr Bennet. I did not see a servant.

Apparently, Mr Bennet had taken refuge from the house as there was a quarrel afoot. He was a pleasant enough fellow but a little shabby.

Finally, he asked the parlour maid to show me into the library. Strangely, every book on the shelves has been penned by a Jane Austen. I was most impressed with a book entitled, ‘Pride and Prejudice’.

I made a note of some words:

‘I declare there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than a book!…When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if it does not have an excellent library.’

Lost in Austen’s books, I read until the clock struck four and my stomach rumbled. Venturing into the corridor, surprised that the house was silent, I decided to depart.  A Miss Austen opened the door and insisted on my company. She informed me that Mr Bennet lives in her imagination, but he had been seen loitering on the doorstop on many occasions.

Amused by my breeches, Miss Austen invited me to take tea with her. She smiled when I explained they are cropped trousers. We sat in a very modest parlour.  The maid served tea and a buttered apple tart.  Delighted that her books had made me forget time, Miss Austen commented that. ‘…for my own part, if a book is written well, I always find it too short.’

This year marks the 200th anniversary of Jane’s death and her books remain popular.  It is a delight to own a beautiful copy of the books.  However, it never fails to amaze me that it is now possible to download the timeless stories for free.

 

Please see all my adventures at Handbag Adventures and my blog at jessiecahalin.com.

Originally posted 2017-09-19 07:00:23.

Welcome to Books in my Handbag

Hello,

Once upon a time my shelves were groaning with the weight of a lifetime of purchases. I didn’t have the money to move so I had to take the books to the charity shop. Inspired by all of those women, in all of those novels; it felt great to be helping others and starting a new life.

Several weeks later, after many car trips, I was stressed, and I heard some dramatic music playing in my head..da! da! dum! Following the music, there was a silence…. I was throwing away all of the voices that had influenced me over the years – but then Mr Kindle came to the rescue. I can now carry all of the narrative voices, with me, in my handbag – result! And now, I will share the books in my handbag with my readers.

Anyway, here goes. I am excited at the idea of blogging and mapping out my interest and comments. Obviously, I can’t fit my ideas in my handbag so I will have to put them here. I am prepared that this could be rather chaotic, but if people read it then I will feel committed to them. Let’s face it, this is just another way of talking, and if no one listens then I will just talk to myself.

Please see Books in Handbag or My Reading to see which books I have reviewed in my handbag.

If you would like to know about what inspired me to write a book see My Writing.

Jessie

 

Check out my blog at jessiecahalin.com

 

Originally posted 2017-03-29 20:42:23.

Cramming my bag full of Angela Petch’s books and her lovers of Italian

Angela Petch 

 

Books in my Handbag is delighted to welcome the inspirational Angela Petch to the Chat Room

‘I’m inquisitive about different cultures and people. Writers are usually nosy, I think.’

Angela Petch was born in Germany, brought up in Italy and England, worked in Amsterdam, Sicily and Tanzania, East Africa. It is no wonder that she is ‘inquisitive about people and culture’. We can also thank Angela’s late father for introducing her to Italy, and I feel certain that he would have been proud of her writing.  Her colourful life is reflected in her colourful writing pallet.  Angela is sensitive, funny and creative: the perfect qualities for a writer

Angela has published ‘Tuscan Roots’ and ‘Now and Then in Tuscany’.  Currently, she is working on the frolics and escapes of ‘Mavis and Dot’- need I say more?

Always full of joie de vivre, Angela insisted that we open a bottle of Prosecco before we commenced the chat.  The sun was shining and butterflies dancing in the Italian garden as we commenced the conversation.

I adore ‘Now and Then in Tuscany’, but please capture your novel in forty words…

Now and Then in Tuscany is a historical narrative which oozes love for Italy and its culture.

The saga of three generations of a Tuscan family which recalls recent hardships and traditions of country life, too easily forgotten in today’s affluent and comfortable Europe.

Absolutely, these elements were beautifully presented in the novel. Now here’s another challenge, read me an extract that captures the essence of your book.

“The ancient wheel beside the convent door stood waiting … like the mouth of a hungry beast, ready for me to place the baby in its wooden drum and push it to the inside of the orphanage.”

You paint the experiences and emotions with words and tell a heart-breaking yet beautiful story. What do the reviewers say about your 5* novel?  Angela searched through the Amazon reviews while I ate crostini. 

This is no disappointment! What-happened-next books are so often disappointing. After the enchanting ‘Tuscan Roots’ (Angela Petch’s first novel set in Tuscany) I was almost afraid to read on. I needn’t have worried. This new book, which continues the story of Anna and Francesco Starnucci, like its predecessor blends a modern-day story with family history in an intricate weaving of now and then. Once again, the author’s love of the landscape and people of this beautiful region shine through, but this is far from being a mere travelogue. Angela Petch is an inspired storyteller who knows how to blend in a touch of mystery to keep the reader guessing.

Reviewer: Perdisma on 13 May 2017

Fascinating people and places. It reminds me in many ways (though it’s much less relentlessly tragic!) of “The Tree of Wooden Clogs”, the prize-winning film by Ermanno Olmi – it has the same intensely imagined and exquisitely detailed recreation of a lost way of life. The photographs are part of this too – at first sight they’re just grainy little black and white images, but each one explains and is explained by the text, so that the more you read the more alive they seem, like Facebook pages from a hundred years ago.
Reviewer:  Rose on Amazon 11 May 2017

Beautifully written and researched. This is a beautifully written and researched family saga that spans three generations of an Italian family. Giuseppe comes from a poor village in Tuscany where the rhythm of life is set by the Catholic Church and the menfolk’s annual winter pilgrimage to warmer winter grazing land for the sheep… The book is full of a subtle yearning. The prose is evocative. The historical narrative is impressively authentic and riven with the author’s love of her subject.

By CA reviews on 7 May 2017

I am not surprised that you have received such accolades that all are all genuinely inspired by your storytelling.  The book has been a labour of love so how did you feel when you had finished the book?

I felt a mixture of relief and sadness when I had finished writing the book. This book took me five years to research and write. At times, it was an agonising process. I struggled with the balance between history and narrative, fearing that my desire to include details about the era was pushing the plot out of shape. At first, I listened to the reactions of too many Beta readers and grew despondent and confused. But I wanted desperately to give birth to “Now and Then in Tuscany”, as I felt it was a period of history that needed to be recorded. I had help from a professional editor in the end.

It is so reassuring to hear that such a great book is the result of a challenging journey.  Do you miss the characters?

I still miss my main character, Giuseppe. He is so firmly placed in the location where we live in Tuscany that I’m sure I catch glimpses of him every now and again as he strides along the mule track.

Two weeks ago, we ate in the old stone house that I had imagined was his. I’m sure he was sitting in a corner by the stove, listening to our conversation and smiling wryly at the way we enjoyed the meal so much: our friend had recreated a peasant’s meal of nettle soup and frittata prepared with the tips of Vitalba (Old Man’s Beard). We enjoyed it as if it were a delicacy. But he would have eaten these ingredients out of necessity.

Would you like any of your characters to read the book, or maybe there is someone else that you have in mind?

My father, Kenneth Sutor, who died twenty six years ago. He introduced his three young children to Italian culture in the 1960’s, when he relocated to Rome to work for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. I still have his 1956 edition of Hachette’s World Guide to Italy that he carried in his pocket for our excursions. Every Sunday he would take us to Mass and afterwards treat the family to a slap-up meal in a simple trattoria. Then, out would come his little blue book and we would be guided round the Villa d’Este or the Via Appia Antica, Colosseum, Subiaco, Assisi…He refused to have us penned up in an apartment in the centre of Rome and found us a ramshackle villa on the outskirts of Rome. The garden was stuffed with Roman statues, orange trees and bordered by vineyards and peach groves. How could I, as an impressionable seven year old, fail to fall in love with Italy?  He was self-educated. Today he would have enjoyed a university education but his family were not wealthy enough to support him. I remember him often engrossed in a history book, reading glasses perched on the end of his nose.

I know you can’t say, but I wonder if I can sense your father in Giuseppe…  I am sure that your father would have been so proud of your book.

I would have loved to see him read my books. Undoubtedly, he would have pointed out the warts but I think he might have been proud of me too. He loved Italy and, on my mother’s request, I scattered his ashes on Italian soil.

I don’t need to be convinced but why should I keep your book in my handbag?

If you are the type of person who recognises that understanding the past helps towards an understanding of the future…

If you want to explore a beautiful and little-known corner of Eastern Tuscany…

If you want to read the story of a young boy with a big heart who overcomes adversity…

If you want to weep and smile at Tuscan love stories…

Then, find a space in your handbag for “Now and Then in Tuscany”.

What is the last sentence written in your writer’s notebook? Angela poured herself another glass of Prosecco and wiped the condensation from the glass. There was a distinct look of mischief in Angela’s eyes as she read the following line:

“…a fluttering of fans from menopausal worshippers, in a church smelling of candle wax and cold, cold stone…”

(For an idea for my WIP, “The Adventures of Mavis and Dot”).

What is the biggest challenge for an independent author?

Getting noticed. To be read in a competitive world where thousands of self-published authors are jostling for space. Engaging with social media has been my biggest challenge but it is the springboard. For a child of the ‘50’s, it doesn’t come easy. I was advised to set up a Twitter account. “Look for like-minded people,” was the advice from a writer friend. So, I typed “Lovers of Italian” in the search bar. I shall leave it to your imagination about the photos of gigolos and semi-naked escorts that popped up. Learning curve is the phrase that is constantly on the tip of my independent author’s tongue.

What is the best advice that you have received as a writer?

Just write. Get it down, capture your words before they fly away.

Afterwards you will have to check and chop, but just write first. In order to have something to work on, just write. I don’t believe in writer’s block.

I agree with you!  Just let the writing flow and banish writer’s block.  Does the countryside inspire you to write more than the city environment?

I like cities in small doses – for the theatre, concerts, art galleries, museums and monuments – but my heart sings in the countryside. I have played tennis all my life but at the moment I need a shoulder operation, so I can’t. Instead, I go for wonderful walks in the mountains. Better than a sweaty gym, any day.

Following the interview, I meandered down an ancient track. I reflected that we are all influenced by the past and the present. And I pondered whether anyone would make a wonderful art house film of Now and Then in Tuscany – the setting is there waiting to be captured on film. 

 

Please see My Guests for all the authors that I have interviewed.

 

Originally posted 2017-06-17 07:00:18.

Eric Seagull, storyteller, landed on my handbag

Introducing the engaging, children’s writer, Caz Greenham and her collection of seafaring adventures.  Who doesn’t love Eric Seagull

Dear readers,

I’m delighted to present an extract from my third children’s book in “The Adventures of Eric Seagull ‘Storyteller’” 3-book-series. ‘The Christmas Circus’. The extract below is taken from one of the many short chapters, making storytelling at bedtime easy.  This gives you a peep inside the magical, fun, seafaring world of Eric Seagull ‘Storyteller’ set in picturesque Brixham Bay. I chose to share ‘The Christmas Circus’ with you today because it’s a seasonal read. A time of friendship and caring at Christmas. And, as we’re already halfway through the month of October (a time I begin my own early Christmas shopping) it would be a great stocking filler for any child. The paperback copy has an eye-catching beautifully illustrated red glossy cover.  A feeling of friendship, and companionship, will be easily recognised in this seasonal read.  Eric Seagull will tell you more about the story

Happy reading,

Caz Greenham

Extract

‘Let’s set the scene, it was Christmas Eve!’ squawked Eric. Eric shuffled from side to side then hopped onto my bag. I think he could smell the gingerbread cookies I had bought from the bakery as a little treat. Caz wagged her finger at Eric and he commenced by setting the scene.

When I received an invitation to The Christmas Circus at Ladybird Cove, the herring gull invited his two friends along. With his tiny best friend and housemate Mouse Herbie, the white mouse, safely aboard his inner feathers and Norman Mail Pigeon following closely behind, they took off from my home (Rock-Face Nest) at St Mary’s Bay in wintry South Devon. After seafaring adventures with Lady Beatrice, Arthur Jellyfish and the Dawn Chorus, I spotted a sign: ‘Christmas Circus This Way’. But the adventurers soon discovered double trouble awaiting them inside The Big Top.

I’ll read you my story.  Eric perched on my handbag and started to tell me the story and it felt as if I was actually in the midst of the adventures.  He remembered every single word beautifully, and Caz was so proud of her little friend. He moved around a little, resisted the temptation to dive into a passer-by’s fish and chips and started to speak…

Extract selected by Eric.
‘You can sleep in the attic room at the top of the winding staircase tonight,’ Eric told Norman. ‘Tis a cosy room and no one should be home alone at this festive time.’

Norman agreed and thanked Eric for his big heartedness.
Norman looked at Herbie. ‘There’s some news that I’ve been meaning to share with you, dear mouse. Your homemade dandelion soup is the talk of Berry Head Park, you know. I look forward to sampling a large bowlful during lunch tomorrow.’

Herbie warmly smiled. ‘There’ll be sweet turnips baked in the oven, baby carrots, and potatoes grown in Eric’s compost. And wait ‘til you taste my best plum pudding.’

Eric Seagull’s long tongue swiped his beak as he listened to his friends chatting about tasty food.

Norman Mail Pigeon landed on the bench and dropped a role of paper.  I removed the red ribbon, opened up the rolled paper and found some reviews of the books.

Ronnie says… ‘I’m delighted to see this author has written a third in this series. I bought the other 2 books already, and have to congratulate the writer on her amazing writing talent and imagination. My grandson has been a follower of Eric Seagull and will love his stocking filler. His eyes will light up when he sees I have been able to obtain an author signed copy, once again. Thank you Caz Greenham. I am looking forward to a 4th in this series real soon. My grandson will be showing off his new Christmas book at school in the New Year, no doubt.’

Louise wrote… ‘After enjoying book 1 and 2, I was excited to hear that book 3 was out! Eric goes on amazing adventures and the author of this book has such a great imagination. The stories are written so well and a nice and easy read, lovely to read to children of very young ages too. Great family books and really enjoy reading about Eric and his exciting adventures.’

About the author
Caz Greenham worked as a secretary for more years than she cares to remember. She’s a mum to grown up daughters, and proud granny to 4 grandchildren aged 2 – 17. She lives in South Devon with her husband and 2 cocker spaniels.

Caz is a great storyteller and says that…
Typing ‘The End’ is a great feeling of relief and achievement. Heavy sighs! However, a sense of loss always follows the finish of all my books! More sighs!

Website: www.cazgreenham.com
Twitter.com/@CazsBooks

Saving Private Tiggy-Winkle

Once upon a time…

As I collected my washing from the washing line, a hedgehog paused at my feet and rested next to a peg on the ground.  Mrs Tiggy-Winkle had come to help me with the washing.  I rushed to collect my camera, hoping that she would wait for me to return.

Hurray!  Mrs Tiggy-Winkle waited for me to capture the moment.  I couldn’t wait to send out the image via Twitter and Facebook.  My husband downloaded the image whilst I searched for an extract from one of Beatrix Potter’s books. The photo was saved in a folder labelled ‘Home Hedgehog’, because she was our hedgehog. Having constructed the post, I pressed send and we raised a glass to our hedgehog.

As expected the notifications and re-tweets followed.  Jenn Bregman said, ‘Sooooo cute!!’.  Angela Petch remarked, ‘Eat those slugs Mrs Tiggy-Winkle…’  The hedgehog charmed everyone.  Author, Jacqueline Kirk, asked, ‘Was the hedgehog out in daylight?’ Pondering this, I knew something was wrong.  Jacqueline tweeted more information. ‘#WildlifeOrphan1 says they are in trouble if out in daylight. The little fella looks small.’

Reality started to kick in, I realised that this wasn’t Mrs Tiggy-Winkle: it was either Ms or Mr Tiggy-Winkle.  Returning to my prized photo, I noticed that he/she was indeed a tiny, fluffy creature.  As my grandmother would have said, he/she is ‘nowt but a bairn’. Should he/she have been out at that time of day?

Jacqueline Kirk sent out a Code Red asking for advice.  I worried all night about the little hedgehog.  The Hedgehog Helpline didn’t answer my call. The following morning, I had a brainwave and contacted John Jackson, author of, ‘Heart of Stone, and hedgehog whisperer. Thankfully, the lovely man messaged me instantly.

‘That’s early, but not exceptional. We’ve had the hedgehogs out before sunset many times.’

Phew! Feeling better, I made myself a cup of tea and then called the Hedgehog Helpline again.  The wonderful woman was so calm and grateful for the call.  Her words echoed those of The Hedgehog Whisperer.  However, I can call the helpline again if the hog appears and they will assess his/her behaviour.  I may have to take my little hog to Hedgehog Hospital.  I didn’t know that these wonderful people existed.  Thank you, Hedgehog Helpline SEW, John Jackson and Jacqueline Kirk!

I will end with Jacqueline Kirk’s tweet:

That’s the beauty of twitter. I only found this out last week and now a little hog on the other side of the country has a kind person looking out for them.

And I hope that the hedgehog lives happily ever after!

 

Please see all of my adventures at Handbag Adventures and my blog at jessiecahalin.com.

Originally posted 2017-08-15 07:00:17.

Helene’s fictional exploration into the human mind

Helene Leuschel

Helene Leuschel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helene grew up in Belgium where she gained a Licentiate in Journalism & Communication, which led to a career in radio and television in Brussels, London and Edinburgh.  She has recently written a collection of novellas.

It was a pleasure to welcome Helene Leuschel to the Chat Room.  I collected her from Cardiff Airport and we could chat on the journey.  I instantly liked her and she was genuinely thrilled to be in Wales. Helene is bright and bubbly and it is obvious that she enjoys meeting people.

Once we arrived, Helene requested some green tea.  She had brought some delicious nutty biscuits from Belgium.   It was rather grey and cold outside, such a contrast to Helen’s home in Portugal.

Jessie:  Welcome to Wales.  Do you speak Portuguese?

Helene:  Olá. Yes.  I attended language classes as soon as I moved to Portugal.  I believe that languages are the door to the county where you live, it allows you to understand people’s customs and habits.  I love meeting people.

 Jessie:  I can imagine that you have met lots of people on your travel and through your profession.  Now, tell me about your book. 

Helene: ‘Manipulated Lives’ is a collection of five novellas, each different in perspective yet with the same core theme: psychological manipulation. From the octogenarian, an ageing mother, young professional to a vulnerable teenager and a manipulator himself, the stories develop the pitfalls that any individual can fall into when charmed and deceived by clever manipulators.

Jessie:  Why did you decide to select the theme of manipulation and what is the genre of your collection of novellas?

Helene: I heard of someone whose husband lied, cheated, deceived and manipulated not only his wife and children but every single person who ever crossed his path in an extremely clever manner. Family members and friends had made numerous attempts to ‘free’ her from her husband’s abusive control, but it took immense courage and determination to eventually follow it through. I realized that during much research and talking to psychologists that manipulators can invade a person’s life at any stage. The five stories, told from five different perspectives, were the result of that creative idea. Maybe my collection of novellas will provide support for someone suffering from manipulation in the future.

Jessie:  Your collection sounds intriguing and thought-provoking.  I like the idea of taking a theme and then presenting it from different perspectives.  It sounds like a unique read. How has the book been received? 

Helene opened her notebook and read from a collection of reviews.

‘The beauty of Leuschel’s collection of stories is how they highlight the way we, as humans, often blind ourselves to the truth which can make us both manipulators and victims. The stories are all character driven by realistic and flawed characters and this allows us to relate to the behaviour depicted no matter how extreme it may become.’ E.L. Lindley

‘This book is made up of a superb collection of 5 short novellas depicting manipulators and the manipulated, highlighting to what extent abusive manipulation can distort and threaten lives.’ Miriam Smith

‘All five of these stories are thought-provoking and emotional and it is clear that the author has well researched her subjects. There is a lot of in this book, but Leuschel gets the balance between information, education and entertainment spot on.’ Feminisia Libros Book Blog

Jessie: Read an extract to tempt a reader.

The moment I wake up, the dismay and desperation are back. I cannot understand why I am lying in this tiny room attached to an IV drip with only a glass of water as my companion.

Jessie: How did you feel when you had finished writing your book, and did you miss any of the characters?

When I finished writing my book, I felt excited as well as apprehensive all at once. It had been a long emotional journey. Thinking about the characters, I guess there is one who I missed the most. It is Molly, the teenager in my story ‘Runaway Girl’. She is still on my mind and the reason why I would like to write a follow up story.

Jessie: Who would you like to read your book and why?  This could be another author, someone famous, a friend or a member of your family.  

Helene: I would like my former neighbour, an experienced clinical psychiatrist to read my book one day (when there is a translation into French available) because throughout her long career working as a private therapist and in prisons, she has witnessed the baffling power of denial time and again.

Jessie: Why should I keep your book in my handbag?

Helene Leuschel

As much as the five novellas are linked by the same underlying theme, they are each a standalone story that can be enjoyed in one single sitting – during a commute, when waiting for an appointment or an hour before going to sleep.

Jessie: What is the last sentence written in your writer’s notebook?

Helene: ‘It had felt right but not for long enough.’

Jessie:  Tell me a little more about this sentence.  Is this an insight into your next book?

Helene: Yes, I have finished with the first draft of my first novel and what felt right for the main character at the start of the story, doesn’t for very long …

Jessie: What is the biggest challenge for an author?

Helene: For me it was pressing the ‘publish’ button. I was exhilarated, worried and nervous all at the same time, so much so that I couldn’t sleep a wink the following night.

Jessie: What is the best advice that you have received as a writer?

There is plenty of good advice around but the following work for me:

  1. Give yourself a daily target – 1000 words, 2000 or more, it doesn’t matter but make sure you sit down and reach the target. Be consistent, so turn off social media, switch off the phone, whatever it takes to remain undisturbed so you stay focused on filling the pages.
  2. When you are finished writing, start editing – be ruthless, don’t hold on to paragraphs that simply don’t sound right. Be brave, send your text to someone who you know is critical as well as fair. Lastly be truthful, write something you’d like to read not what you think could appeal to an audience. It won’t sound authentic.
  3. Don’t give up – feel the story come alive, the characters breathe as if they were real people and most of all enjoy the journey.

Helene lives with her husband and two children in Portugal and recently acquired a Master of Philosophy with the OU, deepening her passion for the study of the mind.  When she is not writing, Helene works as a freelance journalist and teaches Yoga.  Her collection of stories sound intriguing and completely unique.  Helene has received high praise and support from her readers. I admire the fact that she had used fiction to explore a challenging theme.

Helene’s philosophy:

As much as I attempt to see the good and authentic before the ugly and corrupt, what tends to always convey peace and quiet for me is noticing the beauty of nature.

For more information about the author and her upcoming books, please visit

Website www.heleneleuschel.com

Twitter https://twitter.com/HALeuschel

Facebook www.facebook.com/HALeuschel

Goodreads

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15337013.H_A_Leuschel

 

 

Please see all my articles on my blog at jessiecahalin.com

Originally posted 2017-07-15 07:00:26.

Celebrating authors in Handbag Gallery and Chat Room

Last week, the Handbag Gallery was launched to celebrate authors and their work.  I would like to take this opportunity to thank the authors for their overwhelming support.  It has been great to meet such a variety of wonderful authors.

The gallery displays authors’ books in their handbags/bags, and each photograph is linked to details about the author’s book.  It is an opportunity to celebrate all authors and to introduce them to readers and other authors.  Angela Petch also pointed out that ‘it was an excuse to buy a new handbag’.

I am delighted that twenty seven authors have sent me photographs of their books in their bags/handbags.  It is gratifying to receive comments from the authors. The amazing Ian Wilfred commented that ‘it was great fun to be part of BookInHandbag gallery’ and he supported the initiative throughout the launch week.  Many authors and readers said that they ‘loved the idea’ and it was ‘original’. For instance, Caz Greenham tweeted that ‘it was a great idea by Jessie’. Juliet Greenwood shouted ‘hurrah’ when her handbag was displayed.  Imogen Matthews declared that it was an ‘honour to be in such company.’

Viewing the gallery, it is clear to see the creativity informing the composition.  Some compositions suggest drama whereas others are more relaxed.  Rosanna Ley described her composition as ‘exotic’. Many authors take care to co-ordinate their handbag/bag with the front cover of their books.  Every single composition sets the scene and tells a story.  There are themes such as mystery, escapism, adventure and romance.  The images demonstrate the fact that authors are fun story-tellers who absolutely adore a creative challenge! To find out more, step inside the gallery.  You never know who you might meet in the Handbag Gallery

It would be an honour to showcase the novels of more authors.  I invite authors to email a photo of their book in their handbag/bag to jessiecahin@aol.co.uk if they want to be included in the Handbag Gallery.

What next for the jessiecahalin.com blog?

I have been building another room but no builders were required – great savings on the cost of tea and biscuits.

This week, I have been adding the final touches to the Author Chat Room with a picture gallery of My Guests.  I have already interviewed Elaine Jeremiah and am preparing for more authors.  My guest list includes: Angela Petch, Sue Moorcroft, Imogen Matthews, Emily Williams, Jan Ellis, Rosanna Ley, Diane Need, Helene Leuchel and Rosemary Dun.

I was delighted when Imogen Matthews tweeted that, ‘The Author Chat Room is such a great idea! @BooksInHandbag is going from strength to strength.’

This week, I chatted with Angela Petch in Italy as the Chat Room is still under construction.  It was warm out there but a cool glass of Prosecco helped, and we talked for a long time.  Angela is charming and the inspiration behind her story-telling is moving.

Originally posted 2017-06-14 07:00:54.